Cornell University - Visit www.cornell.edu Kirby Research Group at Cornell: Microfluidics and Nanofluidics : - Home College of Engineering - visit www.engr.cornell.edu Cornell University - Visit www.cornell.edu
Cornell University, College of Engineering Search Cornell
News Contact Info Login
Copyright Brian J. Kirby. With questions, contact Prof. Kirby here. This material may not be distributed without the author's consent. When linking to these pages, please use the URL http://www.kirbyresearch.com/textbook.

This web posting is a draft, abridged version of the Cambridge University Press text. Follow the links to buy at Cambridge or Amazon or Powell's or Barnes and Noble. Contact Prof. Kirby here.

[Return to Table of Contents]


Jump To: [Kinematics] [Couette/Poiseuille Flow] [Fluid Circuits] [Mixing] [Electrodynamics] [Electroosmosis] [Potential Flow] [Stokes Flow] [Debye Layer] [Zeta Potential] [Species Transport] [Separations] [Particle Electrophoresis] [DNA] [Nanofluidics] [Induced-Charge Effects] [DEP] [Solution Chemistry]

Chapter 10
Zeta potential in microchannels

In previous chapters, we asserted that a potential drop occurs over an electrical double layer, consistent with the fact that chemical reactions occur at the surface to induce ionization of wall species. We now return to this subject in greater detail. Our goal is to be able to predict the equilibrium surface potential at microfluidic device interfaces, as a function of the device material and solution conditions. This chapter frames the problem, describes associated parameters, and lists several models that can be used to attack this problem and interpret experimental data. We start by clarifying notation and terminology. We then discuss the chemical origins of surface charge for both Nernstianand non-Nernstian surfaces, discuss techniques for measuring and modifying electrokinetic potentials, and summarize observed zeta potentials for microfluidic substrates. Finally, we discuss how electrical double layer theory is related to interpretation of zeta potential data and the relation between ζ and φ0.

Related work on zeta potential from our research group can be found here.

[Return to Table of Contents]



Jump To: [Kinematics] [Couette/Poiseuille Flow] [Fluid Circuits] [Mixing] [Electrodynamics] [Electroosmosis] [Potential Flow] [Stokes Flow] [Debye Layer] [Zeta Potential] [Species Transport] [Separations] [Particle Electrophoresis] [DNA] [Nanofluidics] [Induced-Charge Effects] [DEP] [Solution Chemistry]

Copyright Brian J. Kirby. Please contact Prof. Kirby here with questions or corrections. This material may not be distributed without the author's consent. When linking to these pages, please use the URL http://www.kirbyresearch.com/textbook.

This web posting is a draft, abridged version of the Cambridge University Press text. Follow the links to buy at Cambridge or Amazon or Powell's or Barnes and Noble. Contact Prof. Kirby here.