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Copyright Brian J. Kirby. With questions, contact Prof. Kirby here. This material may not be distributed without the author's consent. When linking to these pages, please use the URL http://www.kirbyresearch.com/textbook.

This web posting is a draft, abridged version of the Cambridge University Press text. Follow the links to buy at Cambridge or Amazon or Powell's or Barnes and Noble. Contact Prof. Kirby here. Click here for the most recent version of the errata for the print version.

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Jump To: [Kinematics] [Couette/Poiseuille Flow] [Fluid Circuits] [Mixing] [Electrodynamics] [Electroosmosis] [Potential Flow] [Stokes Flow] [Debye Layer] [Zeta Potential] [Species Transport] [Separations] [Particle Electrophoresis] [DNA] [Nanofluidics] [Induced-Charge Effects] [DEP] [Solution Chemistry]

5.7 Supplementary reading [electrodynamics top]

The material in this chapter is classical physics, and is covered thoroughly in electricity and magnetism texts. Griffiths [32] is an excellent introductory text, while Jackson [33] is more advanced. Electronic versions of Haus and Melcher [34] are in the public domain. The electrochemical relations for electrodes are generally outside the focus of electricity and magnetism texts, and so texts focusing on electrochemistry [3536] are the most useful. Morgan and Green’s AC electrokinetics text [37] and Jones’s electromechanics of particles text [38] are focused primarily on electromagnetic effects on particles, and both include coverage of material closely related to this chapter. Pethig [39] discusses electrical properties of many materials of interest. Models for the permittivity of water as a function of electric field are found in [40]. For electrical circuits, an introductory electronic circuits text e.g., [41] is useful.

Later chapters in the textbook build on the results in this chapter. We show in Chapter 6 that purely electroosmotic flows can be approximated by solutions to the Laplace equation. Further, the charge conservation equation is important in a number of applications, notably the dynamics of the electrical double layer (Chapter 16), which lead to induced-charge flows (Chapter 16.3), and dielectrophoretic manipulation of particles (Chapter 17). This chapter focuses on ohmic current when considering the charge conservation equation. The effects of convection and diffusion are considered in detail in the context of ion transport in Section 11.3.1.

Useful web resources include the MIT Open Courseware site for Electromagnetic Fields and Energy.

[Return to Table of Contents]



Jump To: [Kinematics] [Couette/Poiseuille Flow] [Fluid Circuits] [Mixing] [Electrodynamics] [Electroosmosis] [Potential Flow] [Stokes Flow] [Debye Layer] [Zeta Potential] [Species Transport] [Separations] [Particle Electrophoresis] [DNA] [Nanofluidics] [Induced-Charge Effects] [DEP] [Solution Chemistry]

Copyright Brian J. Kirby. Please contact Prof. Kirby here with questions or corrections. This material may not be distributed without the author's consent. When linking to these pages, please use the URL http://www.kirbyresearch.com/textbook.

This web posting is a draft, abridged version of the Cambridge University Press text. Follow the links to buy at Cambridge or Amazon or Powell's or Barnes and Noble. Contact Prof. Kirby here. Click here for the most recent version of the errata for the print version.


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