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Copyright Brian J. Kirby. With questions, contact Prof. Kirby here. This material may not be distributed without the author's consent. When linking to these pages, please use the URL http://www.kirbyresearch.com/textbook.

This web posting is a draft, abridged version of the Cambridge University Press text. Follow the links to buy at Cambridge or Amazon or Powell's or Barnes and Noble. Contact Prof. Kirby here. Click here for the most recent version of the errata for the print version.

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Jump To: [Kinematics] [Couette/Poiseuille Flow] [Fluid Circuits] [Mixing] [Electrodynamics] [Electroosmosis] [Potential Flow] [Stokes Flow] [Debye Layer] [Zeta Potential] [Species Transport] [Separations] [Particle Electrophoresis] [DNA] [Nanofluidics] [Induced-Charge Effects] [DEP] [Solution Chemistry]

13.4 Supplementary reading [particle electrophoresis top]

Electrophoresis of particles is central to colloid science, and material in this chapter is also discussed in physicochemical hydrodynamics and colloid science texts [4829495051]. A review by Anderson [81] focuses on the motions of particles owing to interfacial phenomena, and expands to include thermophoresis and other effects.

One can find detailed numerical calculations of particle electrophoretic mobility in [134], measurements in [133], and approximate formulas in [135136]. These are all fundamentally equilibrium treatments. A review by Dukhin [137] focuses on the equilibrium assumptions made in this chapter and how departure from equilibrium affects colloidal motion and characterization of surfaces.

While we do not discuss it here, we must note that the above analysis is for isolated particles in infinite domains. Corrections must be added for particles in finite domains (e.g., microchannels) or for particles at finite density, such that particle-particle interactions can be prevalent. Suspensions of particles are discussed in [6465663].

This chapter has been focused on electrophoresis of solid particles, but droplets can be analyzed using these techniques as well. Relevant results are presented in [657138].

[Return to Table of Contents]



Jump To: [Kinematics] [Couette/Poiseuille Flow] [Fluid Circuits] [Mixing] [Electrodynamics] [Electroosmosis] [Potential Flow] [Stokes Flow] [Debye Layer] [Zeta Potential] [Species Transport] [Separations] [Particle Electrophoresis] [DNA] [Nanofluidics] [Induced-Charge Effects] [DEP] [Solution Chemistry]

Copyright Brian J. Kirby. Please contact Prof. Kirby here with questions or corrections. This material may not be distributed without the author's consent. When linking to these pages, please use the URL http://www.kirbyresearch.com/textbook.

This web posting is a draft, abridged version of the Cambridge University Press text. Follow the links to buy at Cambridge or Amazon or Powell's or Barnes and Noble. Contact Prof. Kirby here. Click here for the most recent version of the errata for the print version.


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