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Copyright Brian J. Kirby. With questions, contact Prof. Kirby here. This material may not be distributed without the author's consent. When linking to these pages, please use the URL http://www.kirbyresearch.com/textbook.

This web posting is a draft, abridged version of the Cambridge University Press text. Follow the links to buy at Cambridge or Amazon or Powell's or Barnes and Noble. Contact Prof. Kirby here. Click here for the most recent version of the errata for the print version.

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Jump To: [Kinematics] [Couette/Poiseuille Flow] [Fluid Circuits] [Mixing] [Electrodynamics] [Electroosmosis] [Potential Flow] [Stokes Flow] [Debye Layer] [Zeta Potential] [Species Transport] [Separations] [Particle Electrophoresis] [DNA] [Nanofluidics] [Induced-Charge Effects] [DEP] [Solution Chemistry]

14.7 Summary [DNA top]

In this chapter, we have described the physicochemical structure of DNA, its transport properties, and its physical models, all with specific application to aqueous solutions of DNA in microfluidic devices. A variety of models were shown to be able to explain DNA conformation and provide predictive scaling for both the conformation and the resulting transport properties, especially diffusion. Much of the DNA analysis is performed in gels, a subject which was omitted. However, DNA properties in bulk solution were discussed, leading to empirical relations for the diffusivity of DNA:

microfluidics textbook nanofluidics textbook Brian Kirby Cornell

and for the electrophoretic mobility:

microfluidics textbook nanofluidics textbook Brian Kirby Cornell

Ideal polymer models combined with the non-draining or Zimm dynamics assumption led to the approximation that D should be proportional to c-(12), while self-avoiding polymer models led to the approximation that D should be proportional to c- 3 5 . The free-draining or Rouse dynamics assumption led to the approximation that μEP should be independent of c. The effects of confinement of ideal polymers in nanochannels was discussed, both in terms of thermodynamic predictions of DNA response to confinement as well as reference to recent research on DNA dynamics in nanochannels and nanoslits.

[Return to Table of Contents]



Jump To: [Kinematics] [Couette/Poiseuille Flow] [Fluid Circuits] [Mixing] [Electrodynamics] [Electroosmosis] [Potential Flow] [Stokes Flow] [Debye Layer] [Zeta Potential] [Species Transport] [Separations] [Particle Electrophoresis] [DNA] [Nanofluidics] [Induced-Charge Effects] [DEP] [Solution Chemistry]

Copyright Brian J. Kirby. Please contact Prof. Kirby here with questions or corrections. This material may not be distributed without the author's consent. When linking to these pages, please use the URL http://www.kirbyresearch.com/textbook.

This web posting is a draft, abridged version of the Cambridge University Press text. Follow the links to buy at Cambridge or Amazon or Powell's or Barnes and Noble. Contact Prof. Kirby here. Click here for the most recent version of the errata for the print version.


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